Zenfolio | The Joyful Tripod | The joyful tripod

So why 'the joyful tripod'?


When taking photographs I try to slow down and absorb the essence of a place, let it speak to me. And on the rare occasions it all comes together and I manage to take a photograph I'm pleased with, the satisfaction and rewards are great, and feelings of joy power through my body. Joy is an underestimated, unappreciated emotion, but once you're tuned into it references leap out at you from many texts.

Poets and photographers seem to be aware of the importance of joy and here are a few quotes I have found: 

 

  • When you do things from your soul, you feel a river moving in you, a joy.

Rumi - Moving Water

 

  • "I often think of that rare fulfilling joy when you are in the presence of some wonderful alignment of events. Where the light, the colour, the shapes, and the balance all interlock so perfectly that I feel truly overwhelmed by the wonder of it."


Charlie Waite

 

  • A silent man in life's affairs, 
    A thinker from a boy, 

    A peasant in his daily cares, 
    A poet in his joy. 


John Clare. The peasant poet

 

  • "The joy and delight photographers’ take in their experience of light may, then, be a sharing of the experience of life itself. Our every photograph is a testament that feeling – almost a prayer of thanks for the miracle of light and life"

Joel Meyerowitz - Sunday Times book of creative photography

 

  • "While with an eye made quiet by the power 
    Of harmony, and the deep power of joy, 
    We see into the life of things."

Wordsworth. Tintern Abbey

 

  • "To photograph is to hold one's breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It's at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy."

Henri Cartier-Bresson

 

  • "He who binds to himself a joy
    Does the winged life destroy; 
    But he who kisses the joy as it flies
    Lives in eternity's sun rise."

    William Blake. Eternity


     
  • "A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
    Its loveliness increases; it will never
    Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
    A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
    Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing."

    John Keats. Endymion

 

  • "I NEVER saw a man in all my days
    —One whom the calm of quietness pervades—
    Who gave not woods and fields his hearty praise,
    And felt a happiness in summer shades.
    There I meet common thoughts, that all may read
    Who love the quiet fields:—I note them well,
    Because they give me joy as I proceed, And joy renewed, when I their beauties tell"

John Clare. Rural scenes

 

  • "What if the point is to stop, then, in your slow movements together, and listen to the birdsong, to watch the dragonflies hover, to look at your lover's face, then up at the undersides of leaves moving together in the breeze? What if the point is to invite these others into your movement, to bring trees, wind, grass, dragonflies into your family and in so doing abandon any attempt to control them? What if the point all along has been to get along, to relate, to experience things on their own terms? What if the point is to feel joy when joyous, love when loving, anger when angry, thoughtful when full of thought? What if the point from the beginning has been to simply be?"

Derrick Jensen. A language older than words